Posted by: Kerry & Jim | 27 August 2013

Cune & Benabbio

We recently visited the little village of Cune which is only 11 kms away but takes a good half hour to drive because of the narrow and winding road, about 550 meters above sea level. The views across the mountain ranges are beautiful, range behind range into the distance.

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On our stroll through the village we met a lovely lady sitting outside her home crocheting doilies. In my very poor Italian I told here we were from Australia and asked to have a look at what she was making. She pulled up a chair for me and began to tell me all about her work even though she new I couldn’t understand. I think she was pleased that I had asked and insisted that I take a small piece of her work back to Australia. She then proceeded to tell Jim all the places we should visit while here. She was a real gem.

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The views down the narrow streets were very pretty.


The beautiful village church which is still used by the parish was built in 1387 and is dedicated to St Bartholomew the Apostle. Some of the paintings are from the fifteenth century.

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Benabbio is about 5km from Bagni di Lucca and close to where the farmhouse is that we were originally going to using while staying in Italy. It is quite a steep climb and sits at 479m above sea level. It’s written history dates back to the 900’s. A lot of the buildings have been renovated or restored and some of the gardens are very pretty. It has a restaurant, pizzaria and small general store.

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The hens looked happy.

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The flowers looked very pretty but this lemon was a little different!!


Responses

  1. So many fabulous little villages so close to where you are staying. I have found the Italian’s, especially the older folk, to always be so generous with their time and help. I presume that lemon is not meant to look like that, freaky !

    • Yes we have found the same. And the lemon….I’m not sure about it.

  2. I don’t know Cune. I must investigate when I return.


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